Nature’s Way: Rewind
WITH MEREL SLOOTHEER

I’m a dreamer, maker, designer, goldsmith, collector, biophile, citydweller living in Haarlem, The Netherlands. I approach the creative process as I would extensive research and trans-late my findings into all sorts of creations. With my work I try to make sense of things I don’t understand and question what might be considered obvious.  Here's my column!

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A couple of years ago I decided to re-watch all my favorite Disney movies. I needed some cheering up and reasoned what made me happy before will probably make me happy now. It did, partially. How could I forget that Disney made some real tearjerkers?

After many years of growing up, an extra layer seemed to have been added to my beloved classics. I found some of the characters even cuter, the jokes funnier, and the artwork more impressive. But ultimately some of the storylines had a deeper impact on me. Sad parts were more relatable and so this particular animation marathon made me feel a bit melancholic.

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t really mind. I love spending my time on stuff that makes me feel emotional, and leaves me with all kinds of new insights.

“The circle of life” is a concept introduced to me in 1994 by The Lion King, and which inspired me to begin a deeper reflection. Procreation, birth, life, death and predation, that seems pretty straight forward right? So what exactly does this cycle contain for us, and does it actually apply to us? 

Animals build throughout their lives. Birds make nests, beavers make dams, rabbits dig dens, bees hives. These creations are practical and biodegradable and they’ll eventually vanish. Just like their creators. Animals do not leave anything behind. Neither do plants. They sprout, grow, sometimes even disrupt our human constructions. But when they go (it might take a while) they’ll leave entirely. What’s left is traces, like roots clinging on walls, or pushing up pavement.

Human beings do things differently and it shows. During our lives we produce and collect so much that we leave behind more than just memories. The way we live disrupts our surroundings so much that we’re changing it for good.

Should we add this to our circle of life, and if so what would we name this extra human step? Our belongings form a giant collective monument, a legacy of stuff, traces made of trash. I can’t stop wondering, especially as a designer and maker, what do I want to leave behind?

Nature’s Way: Rewind
WITH MEREL SLOOTHEER

I’m a dreamer, maker, designer, goldsmith, collector, biophile, citydweller living in Haarlem, The Netherlands. I approach the creative process as I would extensive research and trans-late my findings into all sorts of creations. With my work I try to make sense of things I don’t understand and question what might be considered obvious.  

Here's my column!

A couple of years ago I decided to re-watch all my favorite Disney movies. I needed some cheering up and reasoned what made me happy before will probably make me happy now. It did, partially. How could I forget that Disney made some real tearjerkers?

After many years of growing up, an extra layer seemed to have been added to my beloved classics. I found some of the characters even cuter, the jokes funnier, and the artwork more impressive. But ultimately some of the storylines had a deeper impact on me. Sad parts were more relatable and so this particular animation marathon made me feel a bit melancholic.

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t really mind. I love spending my time on stuff that makes me feel emotional, and leaves me with all kinds of new insights.

“The circle of life” is a concept introduced to me in 1994 by The Lion King, and which inspired me to begin a deeper reflection. Procreation, birth, life, death and predation, that seems pretty straight forward right? So what exactly does this cycle contain for us, and does it actually apply to us? 

" Human beings
do things differently
and it shows…"

Animals build throughout their lives. Birds make nests, beavers make dams, rabbits dig dens, bees hives. These creations are practical and biodegradable and they’ll eventually vanish. Just like their creators. Animals do not leave anything behind. Neither do plants. They sprout, grow, sometimes even disrupt our human constructions. But when they go (it might take a while) they’ll leave entirely. What’s left is traces, like roots clinging on walls, or pushing up pavement.

Human beings do things differently and it shows. During our lives we produce and collect so much that we leave behind more than just memories. The way we live disrupts our surroundings so much that we’re changing it for good.

Should we add this to our circle of life, and if so what would we name this extra human step? Our belongings form a giant collective monument, a legacy of stuff, traces made of trash. I can’t stop wondering, especially as a designer and maker, what do I want to leave behind?

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Nature inspires. An independent magazine dedicated to creativity inspired in any way or form by nature.
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